Report
  1. HOME
  2. 活動報告
  3. イベント情報
  4. ARC-iJAC Activities

ARC-iJAC Activities

 [書込]

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

With the establishment of the International Joint Digital Archiving Center for Japanese Art and Culture (ARC-iJAC) in 2019, the Art Research Center strives to push the internationalization of research activities that transcend disciplines and geographic boundaries.

NEWS

The Shochiku Otani Library released a digital archive of Kabuki bromides (photographic portraits of Kabuki actors) through the Theater Photos Search and Browsing System developed by the ARC-iJAC.
With the online release, users can search and view Kabuki stage photographs from the Meiji era to the prewar period and photographs of famous actors of the past in costume.
We hope this release will enable users to experience the appeal of Kabuki and contribute to the development of research by scholars and those associated with the theatre.
>> Read more.
On the occasion of the release of 4,233 ukiyo-e prints and 74 Japanese old books from ROM's collection in the ARC database, Dr. Takesue shares her thoughts on ROM's extensive and unique ukiyo-e print collection that includes Hiroshige's Meisho Edo Hyakkei and Ogata Gekko prints, as well as actor, landscape, war, and catfish prints, amongst others. >> Read interview.
As part of the ARC research project Visual Culture Studies in the Domestic Sphere Utilizing the ARC Database, an open workshop will be held on Kinugasa Campus.
The project aims to study arts and visual culture in East Asia related to the concept of Ie, which encompasses housing, households, family, and family genealogy within the Domestic Sphere juxtaposed to the Public Sphere.
→ Program
The ARC held an international symposium commemorating the 25th anniversary of its establishment under the theme Liberal Arts Innovation in Digital Humanities and Digital Archives--Exploring Further Possibilities.
Discussing the Center's achievements and future direction, particular emphasis was placed on the concept of public humanities, facilitated through digital archives.
>> Read more.
A joint colloquium of the Center for Japanese Studies (CJS) and the ARC was held at UC Berkeley under the theme Theory and Methods in the Japanese Humanities: Research Using Visual Sources and Archives.
As part of the research collaboration of more than 15 years, the ARC research team, led by Prof. Ryo Akama (Director of the ARC), continued with digital archiving activities of the Japanese collection held by UC Berkeley's C.V. Starr East Asian Library. >> Read more.
The research project, a collaborative scholarly enterprise among researchers and institutions in Japan and the UK led by Prof. Ryo Akama (Director of the ARC) and Dr. Akiko Yano (Curator, The British Museum), aims to analyze the cultural and social impact of art and literary salons and the collective creation of art (gassaku) in early modern Japan, particularly in the Kyoto-Osaka region. This project is supported by the JSPS International Joint Research Program (JRP-LEAD with UKRI). >> Read more.
Video on demand! 123. International ARC Seminar

Speaker: Toshiyasu KAMOGI (Curator & Manager of Curatorial Division, Tokyo Fuji Art Museum)

Topic: The Achievements and Future Outlook of a Homemade Database by a Liberal Arts Computer Enthusiast Curator--From the Frontline of Digital Archive Operation for Streamlining and Enhancing Museum Curatorial Services-- (held in Japanese)

Upcoming Events

November 8 (Wed), 2023, 18:00-19:30 JST
125. International ARC Seminar
Speaker: Ellis TINIOS (Honorary Lecturer, University of Leeds, United Kingdom and ARC Visiting Researcher)
Topic: Hokusai the Alchemist: an exploration of sources for his book illustrations
(held in English)
Live stream available via >> YouTube.

November 16 (Thur), 2023, 13:00-18:00 JST
Open Workshop:
Surface and Depth of the Domestic Sphere in East Asian Art

Venue: Seminar Room 1, Gakujikan Hall 2F, Kinugasa Campus, Ritsumeikan University
Language: Japanese (with English abstract) and English (with Japanese script)

>> Program

November 29 (Wed), 2023, 18:00-19:30 JST
126. International ARC Seminar
Speaker: Timon SCREECH (Professor, International Research Center for Japanese Studies (Nichibunken))
Topic: New Light on Nikkō: Thoughts on the Dutch Lanterns at the Shrine-Mausoleum of Tokugawa Ieyasu (held in English)
Twitter
Website
Instagram
Previous issues:
Summer 2023, Spring 2023, Winter 2022, Autumn 2022, Summer 2022, Spring 2022, Winter 2021, Autumn 2021, Summer 2021, Spring 2021, Winter 2020, Autumn 2020, Summer 2020, Spring 2020
view this email in your browser
Copyright © 2021 Art Research Center, Ritsumeikan University. All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
56-1 Toji-in Kitamachi, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8577 JAPAN

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

関連記事はこちら → ロイヤル・オンタリオ・ミュージアム所蔵の浮世絵版画作品(4233点)と古典籍(74点)が公開されました

関連データベースはこちらRoyal Ontario Museum Ukiyo-e Database / Royal Ontario Museum Japanese Old Books Database

Background:
Dr. Akiko Takesue joined the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in 2021 as the Bishop White Committee Associate Curator of Japanese Art & Culture, an endowed position, and is in charge of researching and developing the ROM's collection of Japanese art and culture that comprises approximately 10,000 objects.
Dr. Takesue holds a doctorate in Art History from York University and Master's degrees from the University of Toronto and the University of New South Wales. In addition to the ROM, she has broad curatorial experience at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, and the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

Dr Takesue, thank you very much for your time today. What sparked your interest in Japanese art history?

ROM2021_18174_57_3.jpgTakesue: It is a long story since I left Japan almost 25 years ago. When I was younger and living in Japan, I was more interested in Western than Japanese art. Hence, I went to Sydney, Australia, to study art. At that time, I had the idea to work in an art gallery dealing with Western contemporary art.

Then, while I was doing an internship at the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney under a Japanese curator, I discovered the beauty and excitement of studying and dealing with Japanese art. Interestingly, I realized the Japanese art collection there was different from what I thought of Japanese art, which was sort of a trigger for me to research the global circulation of Japanese art since the Meiji period.

As the Japanese collections overseas consist of many export arts, i.e., made in Japan but only for the Western market, I discovered many things I never knew about when I was in Japan. So, I became fascinated with the fact that Japanese art in Sydney was indeed different from my understanding of Japanese art. This interest continues even now.

I also investigated in my PhD dissertation how objects stay the same while their meanings shift from time to time, place to place.

How did you first connect with the Art Research Center (ARC)?

Takesue: It was through my predecessor, Dr. Rosina Buckland, who is now at the British Museum. In 2020, she started the digitization project of the ROM's Japanese art collection with Prof. Akama whom I met when he and his team was taking photographs of the collection. So, after Dr. Buckland left in 2021, I continued to complete this project, and I feel fortunate and grateful that she started it.

Comprising approximately 10,000 objects, the Japanese art collection of the ROM is the largest of its kind in Canada. Considered to be particularly comprehensive is the ukiyo-e print collection. What do you find fascinating about it and why?

Takesue: Over 2,000 ukiyo-e prints and surimono of Sir Byron Edmund Walker, one of the founders and the first chairman of the ROM, were bequested to the ROM in 1926, which became the core of our entire Japanese print collection.

973x57.0018.081.jpg

The ROM already had some woodblock prints since 1916, but at that time, no one knew much about Japanese art at the museum. With the Walker Collection and the earlier prints, our print collection expanded, comprising over 4,000 prints today.

Furthermore, there is a variety in the genres of the prints. The ROM's collection consists of actor prints, prints of beautiful women, landscape prints, including those of Hokusai and Hiroshige, as well as prints from the Meiji period and war prints. So not only the sheer number of prints but the range of subjects make our collection quite valuable and unique.

For example, we have an almost complete set of Hiroshige's Meisho Edo Hyakkei (One Hundred Famous Views of Edo). It may not be well-known, but our set is almost like a 'first edition'. 'First edition' may be a tricky term, but our set is in a very good condition, and you can see the highly skilled printing techniques used. While everyone knows about the first edition at the Brooklyn Museum, hardly anybody knows about our set.

When I recently went to the Brooklyn Museum, I compared their set with printouts of some of our prints with the curator there, and we realized that both of our sets are almost identical. So, I was glad I could confirm that our set is also a high-quality series.

You also have a rare collection of Ogata Gekko prints. What are your thoughts on this collection?

Takesue: This collection is very unique, too. Although Gekko was quite well-known in his lifetime in the Meiji period and produced many prints, paintings, and book illustrations, he became somewhat of a forgotten artist.

A Toronto-based collector and former law librarian of York University, Balfour Halévy, accumulated over 600 of Gekko's works and donated the whole collection to the ROM in 2016. According to him, another extensive collection of Gekko prints exists in New Zealand. Since these two collections seem to be the only comprehensive collections dedicated to Gekko outside of Japan, we are very fortunate to have one of them at the ROM.

In June this year, 4,233 ukiyo-e prints and 74 old Japanese books from the ROM's collection were released in the ARC portal database. What is the significance of this database?

Takesue: The contents and quality of our print collection are good, however, not many people, including researchers, seem to be aware that we have such a comprehensive collection of prints. So, we are grateful for this ARC digitization project to make our collection available to researchers and the public for their studies, research, and pleasure. Otherwise, those prints remain just hidden in our storage. Except for a few notable research efforts, the whole collection has not been studied extensively.

Our goal is that many scholars and researchers will take note of the prints in the ROM's collection so we can contribute to the development of ukiyo-e research. The release of our collection marks a significant starting point.

What are your thoughts on the importance of digitization for museums, and how does it play a part in your plans at the ROM?

Takesue: Digitization of the collection is crucial to provide the public access to what we have. The ROM is a huge museum with 13 million objects in total in its collections. So, I believe that anyone can find at least one favorite object.

We try to exhibit as many in the museum as possible, but space is limited. Only less than 5% of our collection is publicly displayed. The rest is in our storage, with many objects never being on public view.

While, as a museum curator, I believe in the power of objects when you see them with your eyes, if a collection is available online, people have another way to enjoy the collection. Availability and accessibility are crucial particularly since we have no permanent Japanese gallery at the ROM right now.

2004.38.0001-48.jpg

I have recently completed an online exhibition on catfish prints. COVID has, in a way, accelerated the development of virtual channels. Digitization has become essential to showcase the Japanese collection at the ROM.

Finally, could you share a few of your personal favorites within the ROM's ukiyo-e print collection?

Takesue: I like ukiyo-e prints with some layers of meaning behind them, for instance, parodies (mitate-e) or complex ideas, which I realized when I did the online exhibition on the catfish prints. They are not just funny prints but encompass emotions and thoughts of people about society at that time. This is why I am fascinated with this kind of print.

Hiroshige's Meisho Edo Hyakkei (One Hundred Famous Views of Edo) is also one of my favorites, mainly because of its composition. Hiroshige uses very striking, innovative perspectives of having something huge at the front with other elements kept smaller at the back, which, at that time, was quite innovative and a reason why Western artists, including Impressionist artists were so fascinated with the Japanese prints.

Images credit: Courtesy of ROM (Royal Ontario Museum), Toronto, Canada. ©ROM

(This interview was conducted by Yinzi Emily Li)


関連記事はこちら → ロイヤル・オンタリオ・ミュージアム所蔵の浮世絵版画作品(4233点)と古典籍(74点)が公開されました

関連データベースはこちら → Royal Ontario Museum Ukiyo-e Database / Royal Ontario Museum Japanese Old Books Database

[イベント情報]
2023年10月18日(水)

2023年10月18日(水)18:00より、Web配信にて第124回国際ARCセミナーを開催いたします。
プログラムは下記となります。

講師:彬子女王殿下

タイトル:「三笠宮崇仁親王とその時代」


日時:2023年10月18日(水)18:00~19:30

参加:関係者のみに別途ご案内しております。

立命館大学アート・リサーチセンターの赤間亮教授(文学部)らの松竹大谷図書館所蔵明治期より戦前までの「 歌舞伎ブロマイド 」をデジタル保存しWeb公開する取り組みが、2023年10月17日の東京新聞で紹介されました。

松竹大谷図書館所蔵貴重資料デジタルアーカイブ「演劇写真検索閲覧システム」
■ URL:https://www.dh-jac.net/db/butai-photo/search_sol.php

関連記事はこちら>>https://www.arc.ritsumei.ac.jp/j/news/pc/019324.html

shochiku_1.jpg2023年度 ARC-iJACプロジェクト「演劇上演記録データベースを活用した、演劇資料画像検索閲覧システムの構築に関る研究」の一環として公益財団法人松竹大谷図書館では10月17日より、明治期より戦前までの 歌舞伎ブロマイドについて、Web上で閲覧できるデジタルアーカイブを公開いたしました。

松竹大谷図書館では令和元(2019)年のクラウドファンディング事業により、歌舞伎ブロマイド12,000点について、デジタル撮影と保存のための資金調達プロジェクトを実施いたしました。

成立後からアーカイブ構築やデータ入力など Web 公開に向け準備を進めておりましたが、この度、ARC-iJACが開発したデジタルアーカイブ「演劇写真検索閲覧システム」において一部公開を開始することとなりました。

shochiku_2.png

この公開により、明治期より戦前までの歌舞伎の舞台写真や往年の名優の扮装写真をWeb上で検索・閲覧することができるようになります。より多くの方に松竹大谷図書館所蔵資料を活用していただくとともに、日本演劇研究へのさらなる貢献ができればと考えておりますので、公開告知へのご協力を賜りますよう、よろしくお願い申し上げます。

松竹大谷図書館所蔵貴重資料デジタルアーカイブ「演劇写真検索閲覧システム」
■ URL:https://www.dh-jac.net/db/butai-photo/search_sol.php

松竹大谷図書館では平成25(2013)年よりクラウドファンディングによる貴重資料のデジタル化や保存プロジェクトに取り組んでおり、毎年成果を上げております。

松竹大谷図書館と立命館大学アート・リサーチセンターがアーカイブ構築を進め閲覧システムでの公開に向け書誌データ(演目、上演年月日、劇場名、役名・俳優名)の入力など準備をして参りましたが、この度10月17日より、デジタルアーカイブ「演劇写真検索閲覧システム」において12,000 枚のうち約5,500 点を公開することとなりました。

演劇写真検索閲覧システムでは、演目名や俳優名などから写真を検索することができます。検索結果のサムネイル画像をクリックすると詳細情報表示画面が開き、演目名や役名、俳優名など詳細情報が表示され、画像も拡大して見ることができます。

当時の歌舞伎の舞台や名優たちの姿が記録されている貴重な資料である歌舞伎ブロマイドのデジタルアーカイブ公開により、より多くの方に歌舞伎の魅力を感じていただき、研究者をはじめ幕内関係者の研究発展に貢献できればと考えております。なお公開後もより優良なデジタルアーカイブを目指し、引き続きデータの検証・考証を続けて参ります。

2023年10月15日(日)、アート・リサーチセンター センター長の赤間亮教授が進めている、海外の美術館コレクションをデジタル化する取り組みが日本経済新聞に紹介されました。

[イベント情報]
2023年10月11日(水)

2023年10月11日(水)18:00より、Web配信にて第123回国際ARCセミナーを開催いたします。
プログラムは下記となります。

講師:鴨木年泰氏(公益財団法人 東京富士美術館 学芸課長)

タイトル:「文系パソコンオタクの学芸員による手作りデータベースの到達点と今後の展望 -美術館の学芸業務を合理化・活用できるデジタルアーカイブの運用の現場から-」


日時:2023年10月11日(水)18:00~19:30

参加:Zoom配信(関係者のみ・予約不要)

※ARCメンバー以外の方は Youtubeよりご参加いただけます。こちらからご覧下さい。

2023年10月8日(日)、アート・リサーチセンター センター長の赤間亮教授が進めている、海外の美術館コレクションをデジタル化する取り組みが日本経済新聞に紹介されました。

doyoukouza_main-img.jpg

25周年記念国際シンポジウム

立命館大学アート・リサーチセンターは、2023年度に設立25周年を迎えたことを記念して、25周年記念国際シンポジウムを開催いたしました。

日時:2023年9月30日(土) 15:00~17:30
開催:ハイブリッド開催(創思館 101 +オンライン)

タイトル:デジタル・ヒューマニティーズとデジタル・アーカイブによる学藝の⾰新-そのさらなる可能性を探る-

 立命館大学アート・リサーチセンターは、2023年度に設立25周年を迎えます。設⽴以来、学術都市京都にある⽴命館⼤学の芸術・⽂化研究の拠点として、デジタル技術を活⽤した新たな研究を⽬指してきました。このようなデジタル技術を⼿法とした研究は、デジタル・ヒューマニティーズ(⼈⽂学)と呼ばれるようになり、⼈⽂学の最も先進的な研究領域となり注⽬を集めています。そのため、アート・リサーチセンターの役割は、ますます重要度を増してきており、国内のみならず、海外のデジタル・ヒューマニティーズをも牽引する存在になってきています。

 また、デジタル・ヒューマニティーズの基盤となるデジタル環境は、デジタル・アーカイブによって構築されています。アート・リサーチセンターは、現在、⽂部科学省から国際共同利⽤・共同研究拠点として認定され、「⽇本⽂化デジタル・アーカイブ国際拠点」として、海外からも多くの研究プロジェクトを受け入れ、活動を強化しています。

 アート・リサーチセンターにおいてこの25年間に研究蓄積されてきた日本の伝統文化を中心とするデジタル・アーカイブは、すでにオープン化されている他機関のアーカイブズとも紐付けされつつ、日本文化資源のビックデータの一角を形成しつつあります。さらに、メタバースや生成型AIの急速な浸透に見られるように、人間がデジタル空間をもう一つの活動領域として本格的に切り開いていく端緒にあたる現在、そのような文化資源のビックデータは、専門的な学術研究用のソースとしてだけではなく、より社会に開かれた活用が求められる人類共通のデジタル資源になっていくと考えられます。

 デジタル・アーカイブが切り開いたデジタル・ヒューマニティーズの地平は、パブリック・ヒューマニティーズとも言うべき社会的な革新と拡張を迎えつつあります。今年度、25周年という⼀つの区切り際して、デジタル・アーカイブに関わる重要な業績を積み上げられ、アート・リサーチセンターの活動についても様々なアドバイスをいただいてきたゲストをお招きし、センターの到達点と今後の方向性を議論しつつ、さらに国内外の関連機関、研究者との連携を図るため、記念シンポジウムを開催します。

講師:
 ⾚間亮(⽴命館⼤学アート・リサーチセンター センター⻑/⽂学部 教授)
 ⾼野明彦(⽴命館⼤学⾐笠研究機構 招聘研究教員)
 杉本重雄(筑波⼤学 名誉教授)
 Graeme Earl(ロンドン⼤学東洋アフリカ研究学院(SOAS)⼈⽂学部⻑)
 細井浩⼀(⽴命館⼤学アート・リサーチセンター 副センター⻑/映像学部 教授)
 【司会】Travis Seifman(⽴命館⼤学アート・リサーチセンター リサーチマネージャー)

>>プログラム

25th anniv_program_jp.PNG


 >>立命館大学土曜講座

doyoukouza_main-img.jpg

25周年記念国際シンポジウム

立命館大学アート・リサーチセンターは、2023年度に設立25周年を迎えたことを記念して、25周年記念国際シンポジウムを開催いたします。

日時:2023年9月30日(土) 15:00~17:30
開催:ハイブリッド開催(創思館 101 +オンライン)

タイトル:デジタル・ヒューマニティーズとデジタル・アーカイブによる学藝の⾰新-そのさらなる可能性を探る-

講師:
 ⾚間亮(⽴命館⼤学アート・リサーチセンター センター⻑/⽂学部 教授)
 ⾼野明彦(⽴命館⼤学⾐笠研究機構 招聘研究教員)
 杉本重雄(筑波⼤学 名誉教授)
 Graeme Earl(ロンドン⼤学東洋アフリカ研究学院(SOAS)⼈⽂学部⻑)
 細井浩⼀(⽴命館⼤学アート・リサーチセンター 副センター⻑/映像学部 教授)
 【司会】Travis Seifman(⽴命館⼤学アート・リサーチセンター リサーチマネージャー)

>>プログラム

25th anniv_program_jp.PNG

参加費:無料・事前申込制(定員400名)
 >>お申込

アート・リサーチセンターは、2023年度に設立25周年を迎えることとなりました。これもひとえに皆様方の多大なるご支援の賜物と心より感謝申し上げます。
来場者の皆様に心からのお礼を込めて、素敵なプレゼントをご用意してお待ちしております。

クリアファイルプレゼント

 立命館大学アート・リサーチセンターは、2023年度に設立25周年を迎えます。設⽴以来、学術都市京都にある⽴命館⼤学の芸術・⽂化研究の拠点として、デジタル技術を活⽤した新たな研究を⽬指してきました。このようなデジタル技術を⼿法とした研究は、デジタル・ヒューマニティーズ(⼈⽂学)と呼ばれるようになり、⼈⽂学の最も先進的な研究領域となり注⽬を集めています。そのため、アート・リサーチセンターの役割は、ますます重要度を増してきており、国内のみならず、海外のデジタル・ヒューマニティーズをも牽引する存在になってきています。

 また、デジタル・ヒューマニティーズの基盤となるデジタル環境は、デジタル・アーカイブによって構築されています。アート・リサーチセンターは、現在、⽂部科学省から国際共同利⽤・共同研究拠点として認定され、「⽇本⽂化デジタル・アーカイブ国際拠点」として、海外からも多くの研究プロジェクトを受け入れ、活動を強化しています。

 アート・リサーチセンターにおいてこの25年間に研究蓄積されてきた日本の伝統文化を中心とするデジタル・アーカイブは、すでにオープン化されている他機関のアーカイブズとも紐付けされつつ、日本文化資源のビックデータの一角を形成しつつあります。さらに、メタバースや生成型AIの急速な浸透に見られるように、人間がデジタル空間をもう一つの活動領域として本格的に切り開いていく端緒にあたる現在、そのような文化資源のビックデータは、専門的な学術研究用のソースとしてだけではなく、より社会に開かれた活用が求められる人類共通のデジタル資源になっていくと考えられます。

 デジタル・アーカイブが切り開いたデジタル・ヒューマニティーズの地平は、パブリック・ヒューマニティーズとも言うべき社会的な革新と拡張を迎えつつあります。今年度、25周年という⼀つの区切り際して、デジタル・アーカイブに関わる重要な業績を積み上げられ、アート・リサーチセンターの活動についても様々なアドバイスをいただいてきたゲストをお招きし、センターの到達点と今後の方向性を議論しつつ、さらに国内外の関連機関、研究者との連携を図るため、記念シンポジウムを開催します。


 >>立命館大学土曜講座

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11